Polygamy 101

I don’t really have anything new here, just pointing out my series of posts on D&C 132, starting here. Links to successor posts are in the headers. Have fun.

D&C 10. Part 6. Verses 42-70.

Part 5 is here.

The earliest text for verses 1-41 of D&C 10 is the Book of Commandments. However, an earlier copy of verses 42-70 is found in Revelation Book 1 (the Book of Commandments and Revelations ms published in the opening volume of the Joseph Smith Papers’ Revelations and Translations series). The RB 1 dates this entry to April 1829. But there may be reasons to think of it as somewhat later than this.
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D&C 10. Part 5. Verses 30-41.

This segment of the revelation continues the discussion of the manuscript thieves and their designs in using it. The role of Satan in the theft or at least in the plans for using the manuscript is fleshed out. There is some hint at the content of the lost manuscript and it appears that in some ways if must be inferior to the proposed alternate text. As usual, changes from the 1833 Book of Commandments and the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants are indicated in red. We discuss some aspects of these following the comparative text. While the text on the right is from the 1835 publication, we have inserted modern verse numbers in the 1835 text for easy reference.
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D&C 10. Part 4. Verses 20-29.

[Part 3 is here.]

In this part we consider verses 20-29 of the 1981 edition, but display the text from the Book of Commandments and the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants.
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D&C 10. Part 1. External Characteristics.

Recently we took a rather detailed look at some aspects of D&C 107 which plays a remarkable role in LDS Church structure and function. (See here for Parts 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12).

We now turn to another of Joseph Smith’s revelations. Section 10 of the 1981 edition of the LDS Doctrine and Covenants is an interesting text for several reasons. It seems to mark a transition in the nature of Joseph Smith’s revelations. Moreover, an internal analysis of the text offers certain mysteries and curiosities. We will investigate some of these in this series. First though, an external picture of the text.
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D&C 107. Part 12. Epilogue. Further Light and Knowledge.

How appropriate. Twelve Parts. Part 11 is here.
D&C 107 was a long time in the making and it contains many separate revelations woven together into the whole (and it didn’t finish the story: consider D&C 112 and 124). Witness: The Nov 11 revelation, itself perhaps two separate revelations, the vision of the Seventy, the vision of Adam, the esoterica of bishops, the “book of Enoch” and others. Its story is one worth telling, not only to understand the process of revelation, but to understand the way Latter-day Saints speak and how that speech and its understanding were effected by the processes of history. I apologize for being short on annotation, but hey, that’s what comments are for! I hope you had some fun reading in “long form.” (grin)
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Resurrection Theory-1843

Joseph Smith was at least two people. I’m not speaking of fathers and sons with the same name, or schizophrenia qua Brodie, but the duality that lived in Smith’s intellectual life. The perfect illustration is the scriptural dictum: seek learning by study and also by faith.[1] When Joseph spoke, you couldn’t always tell what his source was. His own mind, God’s mind, or someone else’s mind. Naturally, there are folks who believe it all came out of his own head. For various reasons, I disagree (i.e., I think all three were actualized), so I want to consider the richer situation.
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A Systematic Theology – B.H. Roberts’ Dream

In 1912, Brigham Henry Roberts had finished his editorial adventure in LDS church history with the closing of his introductory essay to volume 6 of the History of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. His final paragraph reads:
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Lorenzo Snow – Mormonism and Oberlin College, part I.

The brilliant Lyman Beecher who held anti-slavery views (and whose children exceeded his own fame) was head of Lane Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio in 1833. Beecher admitted a former slave to the school, which scandalized many residents of the city.

The following year, while Beecher was away from the school, rumors circulated that black and white students at the seminary were socializing on an equal footing. Mobs attacking the school became a real possiblity and the board of trustees immediately imposed what were essentially segregational rules. A large number of students decided to leave the school and eventually took up residence at Oberlin, Ohio and became part of the college there.

In the agreement that made the Lane students Oberlin students, color integration became a founding principle of Oberlin. It was in this environment that Lorenzo Snow (1814-1901) came to the school. Read more of this post

When Souls Had Wings – Givens and Preexistence

I’ve been having a look at Terryl Givens’ latest effort: on preexistence in western thought. So far it seems to be quite good. Read more of this post

Short Review: The Joseph Smith Papers Revelations and Translations (first volume in the series)

Just a short review of the R&T volume. I’ve been so busy with school matters that if I don’t do it now, I’ll forget again. (I’ve altered some of the verbiage here to correspond with Constance Lewis’s comment below.)

This volume: 23x40cm, you’ll need to use the tall shelf. Weighing in at 7lbs 10oz, you won’t want to take it jogging or haul it in the brief case very far. There are 707 standard pages, with front matter numbered in Roman. Pages are of high quality matte finish acid free paper. Color and format of the dust jacket follows the initial volume of the Papers, volume 1 of the journals series. At $99.95 retail, a bargain.
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More Stuff on Boap.org – Doctrine and Covenants Studies

This is late for the LDS Sunday school’s Doctrine and Covenants-church history study, but it may be helpful if you’re are interested in textual study of the D&C: how revelation text has evolved, the identity of persons mentioned in the revelations and some other historical issues involving the revelations (like evolution of priesthood concepts), publication info, and besides that, it is free. If you go to boap.org and scroll down the page a bit you will see an “annotated history of the church” link. clicking on that link will lead you a page of links to the first 25 or so chapters of volume one of the B. H. Roberts edited seven volume history of the LDS church. Admittedly, this isn’t very much of the text, but it took a considerable amount of work just to do this much.
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Is Reality Consistent with First Order Predicate Calculus?

The whole of science is based on answering yes to that question. But what about religion? At least from Augustine to Aquinas, people hoped the answer was yes. Of course they wouldn’t have used the same terminology.
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Ontological Revelation

Paul Tillich drew a distinction between “ontological” reason and “technical” reason. Not being too picky here about what he meant, I’ve been wondering if one can make a distinction in revelation, particularly I’m thinking of Joseph Smith’s revelations and “near revelations.”[1]
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