Imagine a new Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith

What would it look like? What goes in it? How would this be received if some beloved statements were absent? Could it be a Deseret Book product? Should texts that were obviously (or less obviously) co-productions or contemporarily ghostwritten be allowed? Where should the circle be drawn? Just curious.

More on the April 8 Discourse

While looking at the manuscript history of the Church today, I saw some interesting examples of editing which I thought I would share. One comes from Joseph Smith’s address of April 8, 1844. The part I’m thinking of is this:

we calculate to give the Elders of Israel their washings and anointings, and attend to those last and more impressive ordinances; without which we cannot obtain celestial thrones; but there must be a holy place prepared for that purpose. There was a proclamation made during the time that the foundation of the temple was laid to that effect; and there are provisions made until the work is completed, so that men may receive their endowments

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The Parallel Joseph-A History?

Years ago, I can’t remember when we started to do it exactly, but we began to collect Joseph Smith’s sermon reports. Of course, Andrew Ehat and Lyndon Cook had published reports of Nauvoo sermons in the groundbreaking (1980) Words of Joseph Smith -WJS. This was an effort that could be classified as part of the New Mormon History in a way, although it was not analytical per se. It was reprinted 10 years later. It is a work that does not resonate with average Mormons, partly because it brings to the forefront some of the uncertainty that exists regarding what Joseph said. Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith has been rather a standby since its 1938 publication and has basically remained fixed since then, except for Richard Galbraith’s Scriptural Teachings of the Prophet Joseph Smith in 1993. I think that was a big seller for Deseret Book. Just reading the title, one might think that it merely extracted those teachings of JS which were “scriptural” somehow, or that it sought to supply scriptures implicitly referenced by JS in his speeches or “writings.” But it was neither of those. It was an attempt to match LDS scripture passages with TPJS passages as the author saw links. I do not know if it is still in the D-Book arsenal. Meanwhile, there were some privately published “parallelized” versions of some of JS sermons, some possibly extracted from Ehat and Cook, I don’t know.
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