Presiding Bishopric, IV.

With the revelations of November 1 and 11, 1831 helping to define the role of the bishop,[1] you can see that the road was being paved for more bishops in the Church. As temporal ministers, it was only a matter of time before more were called as Church population increased (when Partridge was called there were about 150 members in Ohio). At first, two population centers developed: Zion (Missouri) and Kirtland (Ohio). Bishop Partridge was a leading voice in governance in Zion. At the end of 1831, another bishop, Newel Kimball Whitney, was called for the Kirtland area (by that time Ohio membership numbered about 1,500) and among other things to work in tandem with Partridge in the United Firm (UF — the Church “corporation” if you will). Partridge, Whitney and their counselors formed an important financial administrative body in the firm. Whitney was relatively well off and his business operations in Kirtland became the heart of the firm there.[2]
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Presiding Bishopric, III.

Doctrine and Covenants section 68 contains important material regarding bishops. It is also interesting its textual evolution. I’ll begin by considering a proto-version of verses 13 through 24 (as they appear in Revelation Book 1, Joseph Smith Papers Manuscript Revelations volume) and then I’ll look at the current text of the D&C. In the RB-1 text, observe that the blue text is omitted from the current edition. In verses 13-24 in the current imprint, the text in red is additional text added to the 1831 revelation—this additional text appeared first in the 1835 Doctrine and Covenants.
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Presiding Bishopric, II.

Mormon Bishops, much like their post-New Testament counterparts did, evolved several classes of duties. Those duties augmenting or adding to those outlined or suggested in the precursor to D&C 42 and various additions like D&C 51. D&C 107 is a revelation of many historical parts, several of those being in the segment from verse 58 onward. That segment for the most part was given November 11, 1831. There the first ordained Mormon bishop, Edward Partridge,[1] learned a bit more about the relation of the office to other Church officers and his duties regarding Church discipline. The relevant part of the revelation originally read something like this: [see RB-1.]
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Presiding Bishopric, I.

A few years ago I did a series of posts at BCC on the Presiding Bishopric of the LDS Church. This is a bit of a rehash of that series, slightly updated. And I rather enjoy the topic anyway.

The priesthood office of “bishop” in Mormonism derives from two early revelations. The first was dictated in New York, January 2, 1831.

And now, I give unto the church in these parts a commandment, that certain men among them shall be appointed, and they shall be appointed by the voice of the church;
And they shall look to the poor and the needy, and administer to their relief that they shall not suffer; and send them forth to the place which I have commanded them;
And this shall be their work, to govern the affairs of the property of this church.[D&C 38:34-36]

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The New General Relief Society President: God Can Make Your Ordinariness into Something More

General Relief Society President, Jean Bingham:

“Growing up, although I enjoyed learning, I was not the top student in any class. I cannot boast of any expert skills. … I was never asked to the prom, I wasn’t the president of anything, I was never one of the popular group.
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Come and See: Steve Peck Discusses His New Book at Writ & Vision

http://us10.campaign-archive2.com/?u=fd469ebd5d28624a9a6247618&id=96248469ac&e=854d51ec4d

Steven Peck – Author Signing and Panel

Please join us Thursday, April 13th, at 7 pm as we welcome acclaimed novelist, scientist, and poet Steven Peck to discuss is new book SCIENCE THE KEY TO THEOLOGY.

Professor Peck will be joined by Zina Petersen and Steve Evans for a panel discussion on the book, as well as on science and religion and other boring subjects.

SCIENCE THE KEY TO THEOLOGY is the inaugural title from the newly announced BCC Press, a non-profit Mormon publisher.

Read more about BCC Press here:

Announcing BCC Press

Come join us for this exciting discussion and to get signed copies of this groundbreaking new book.

The event is free and open to the public and light refreshments will be served.

Writ & Vision
274 Center St.
Provo, Utah 84601

A New Mormon Oriented Press: BCC Press

Steve Evans and the crew at the By Common Consent blog began discussing the idea of a new outlet for Mormon literature some time ago. Plans fell into place as the bloggers realized that the group housed people with the tools to make such an enterprise work. It’s a volunteer army over there and a nonprofit effort. Proceeds go to maintain press expenses (someone has to buy the paper) and to authors. How the model works over time is to be determined but the enthusiasm and the talent pool is there. See the web page.

Where does BCC Press live within the somewhat limited Mormon publishing industry? I think that remains to be seen. Will it found a new journal? Publish scientific research? Unlikely. But what about promising fiction authors? Or innovative theological work? That seems to be fair game. The press wants to help shape Mormon thought and that means engaging fine authors with important projects. Certain kinds of devotional literature seem in play. Considering what BCC Press is not may be helpful in defining its place. It is not an academic press, though literature of academic quality may be in view. It is not Deseret Book, though books on personal faith journeys seem part of the charter. In essence, the field is open as wide as the expertise of its volunteer workforce. For more information, see here.