Jonathan Edwards Center Reception

Those of you within striking distance of New Haven may be interested.

The Jonathan Edwards Center has been given larger, newly renovated spaces by Yale Divinity School, and we invite you to a reception to help us celebrate and officially to open our new home. Please join us on February 22, 2018, 4:00-6:00 p.m., in the lower level of the northeast wing of the Divinity School. Attendees can enjoy refreshments, tour the facilities, meet our staff and research fellows, and view a special exhibit of original Edwards artifacts kindly provided by Rev. Robert Rafford of Middlebury, Connecticut. Door prizes include copies of Edwards volumes signed by the editors.

Please RSVP by February 15 to 2034325341.

Advertisements

Textual Studies of the Doctrine and Covenants: The Plural Marriage Revelation

My book on Doctrine and Covenants section 132 will arrive, February 27, 2018 from Greg Kofford Books. I’m looking forward to it at least. Here’s the Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/textualstudies132/

Or @TextualStudies132

Here’s the cover.

Joseph Smith Papers, Documents, Vol. 6 Editors Talk about the volume.

Lead editor, Mark Ashurst-McGee, gives an overview of the period for the volume.

Documents 6 is an especially important volume in the Documents series, covering the period where the Saints exit Kirtland and establish Far West, Missouri. There is an explosion of revelation during this 1838–1839 period and of course, the Mormon–Missouri War is represented in the volume, along with Danites, Hawn’s Mill, Crooked River, Liberty Jail, and the exodus to Commerce, Illinois. Take a look as the editors give more details: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UjLTIocks0c&feature=em-subs_digest

Women of Faith Vol 4 Meet the editors and authors.

Jonathan Edwards Center Upcoming Lecture

The Jonathan Edwards Center presents a lecture by Prof. Michal Choinski Jagiellonian University Krakow, Poland “A Preacher in the Hands of Statisticians: A Stylometric Analysis of Jonathan Edwards” Jonathan Edwards Dining Room Yale Divinity School Tuesday, Sept. 26 12:00-1:15 p.m. This presentation focuses on ways in which stylometry can contribute to the study of Edwards’s corpus, particularly sermons. An intoduction to the quantitative method of text analysis is followed by the outcomes of three stylometric experiments: on typology in Edwards’s writings; on the sentiment-analysis of the word “God”; and on evidences of Edwards’s sometime editor Thomas Foxcroft. Prof. Choinski is author of The Rhetoric of the Revival: The Language of the Great Awakening Preachers (2016) and co-editor of Cognitive Linguistics in Action: From Theory to Application and Back (2010).

Presiding Bishopric, VI.

Final Installment

Summarizing and expanding a bit here. Responsibility profiles for the PB have varied. In the 1970s they became more deeply connected with the Church’s youth organizations. Eventually that role was withdrawn and they now function in supervising Church business matters including real estate, commercial corporate interests, humanitarian operations, etc. though at present the Presiding Bishop sits on the Church PEC, hence he is a discussion partner in youth issues.[1] Read more of this post

Presiding Bishopric, V. The First Presiding Bishops.

The First Presiding Bishop, Newell K. Whitney

After the death of Joseph Smith in June 1844, it became clear that the Latter-day Saints would leave Illinois. The majority of Nauvoo Saints went west with the apostles, and they needed assistance in dealing with those who required food, transportation, and shelter. In the lay over region called Winter Quarters, near present day Omaha, Nebraska, the need was great enough in 1846 that small wards of roughly 500 persons were created with a bishop for each.[1] As Utah was established a similar pattern developed but the office became richer yet.

Church leaders finally appointed a Presiding Bishop in 1847, Newell K. Whitney. Whitney was one of the first bishops in the church, but this was a new assignment. As Presiding Bishop, Whitney served without counselors until his death in 1850. At the same time, Whitney presided over a corps of other bishops that developed over time: “traveling bishops,” who moved among various communities, stake bishops who operated within the boundaries of one stake, general bishops, who supervised various stakes, regional bishops, who moved among the Mormon communities, regulating the work of “located” bishops in those communities and collecting donations-in-kind for redistribution.

When Whitney died in 1850, Edward Hunter became his successor:[2]
Read more of this post