Joseph Smith’s Dispensational Transition: Elias to Elijah to Messiah

[A prerequisite to understanding this post is a solid reading of its base text here.]

In Joseph Smith’s “first” King Follett discourse (March 10, 1844) he codifies a bit of Mormonism that had been fluttering around its edges from the beginning: the transition from beginning the movement to fleshing it out. There are many ways this plays out between 1820 and 1844. As Pete Crawley astutely observed: Read more of this post

John Wesley, Methodism and Staking out Mormon Doctrines

W. J. Abraham and J. E. Kirby’s The Oxford Handbook of Methodist Studies gives some insight into some issues of antebellum American Methodism that play into the shaping of Mormon doctrine, in the sense that Mormonism, at its outset, felt the need to define its positions in the controversies of the day. I quote:
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Personal Savior: Change and Confluence in Religious Rhetoric

Glen Leonard observed (somewhere in his Nauvoo: A Place of Peace, A People of Promise I think) that in 1985 the LDS Church consciously altered course in both its public persona and public rhetoric. In a way, outwardly fathered by the correlation idea, the Church moved to focus its message more simply and more on Christ. I observed the results of this effort in a number of ways.
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