The Return of Lorenzo Barnes: Don’t Leave My Bones Far From Home

In the spirit of rehashing old ground (former posts), I offer you the following on Lorenzo Barnes. Barnes was an Ohio period convert to Mormonism and a perennial missionary for the Church from that time until his death in late 1842 while in missionary service in England. Barnes’ was in some sense a kind of ordinary Mormon, not one who found place among central Church leadership. Barnes’ personal life is largely unknown, but a budding romance caught the eye of several, including Wilford Woodruff who kept track Barnes’ lost love in order to reminisce.

As far as this post is concerned, Lorenzo Barnes is in the spotlight because Joseph Smith offered memorial remarks in his behalf when the news of Barnes’ death reach Nauvoo and hence Barnes gets a chapter in our book. The sermon drives Lorenzo’s history — after his death! Take a look at our first post about Lorenzo:

Lorenzo Barnes

Resurrection Theory-1843

Joseph Smith was at least two people. I’m not speaking of fathers and sons with the same name, or schizophrenia qua Brodie, but the duality that lived in Smith’s intellectual life. The perfect illustration is the scriptural dictum: seek learning by study and also by faith.[1] When Joseph spoke, you couldn’t always tell what his source was. His own mind, God’s mind, or someone else’s mind. Naturally, there are folks who believe it all came out of his own head. For various reasons, I disagree (i.e., I think all three were actualized), so I want to consider the richer situation.
Read more of this post